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Archive for the ‘Climbing/Vining Plants’ Category

When I was small we would go for walks with our mother in the neighborhood and stop and look at the gardens, some were interesting others where more playful and some just a plain messy. You could tell the ones who liked kids by the plants they often chose, fun ones like squashes, scarlet runner beans, and bright flowers like Cosmos, Marigolds and who could not resist Nasturtiums!  Nasturtiums(Tropaeolum majus) are a fond memory of many of us who had them in our garden when we where young.

The bright array of colors found in Tropaeolum majus always appeals to children of any age.

The bright array of colors found in Tropaeolum majus always appeals to children of any age.

Tropaeolum majus orginally is from South America, growing in an area from Bolivia and Columbia and is said to be found in areas such as central Chile as well.  Nasturtiums were first brought to Europe by Spanish around 1500, it is likely seeds where carried back. In South America the plant was used for medicinal purposes such as treating coughs, colds, flu by creating at tea. Topically it was used in poultice for for cuts and burns. Nasturtiums are high in vitamin c and have natural antiboitics in them. It was in Europe that the plant was first used for culinary purposes.

Here the trailing variety of Nasturtium is used as a simple but charming ground cover that is a riot of color during summer and autumn.

Here the trailing variety of Nasturtium is used as a simple but charming ground cover that is a riot of color during summer and autumn.

As a culinary plant Nasturtiums have a lot to offer: the leaves, flowers, stems and buds can all be used and impart a spicy sweet flavor reminiscent of Garden Cress (Lepidium savaticum) or Water Cress(Tropaeolum officinale). The flowers and leaves are used in many ways from salads to sandwiches, in dressings and spreads. The flower buds are pickled and used as a substitute for capers. I like to use the stems as they are especially spicy and add them into salads, my dad who loved extra spicy things was surprised with the intensity of heat in them.

Nasturtium leaves are unusual as the stem is attached to the very middle of the leaf giving it a curious round shape which is part of this plants charm.

Nasturtium leaves are unusual as the stem is attached to the very middle of the leaf giving it a curious round shape which is part of this plants charm.

The unusual shape of the leaves and flowers lead Linnaeus to choose a an interesting botanical Latin name for Tropaeolum majus. ‘Trope’ is from the Greek tropaion or trophy which refers to how the round shields(leaves) and helmets(flowers) where hung on a pillar which was said to be a sign of victory on a battlefield.  The common name Nasturium comes from the latin ‘nastos’ (nose) and ‘turtum’ (torment) and this refers to the spicy taste of the plant. Majus just means big which refers to the size of the leaves.

The stained glass coloring of the Nasturtium flowers and the curious rounded leaves have inspired for many famous artists and writers.

The stained glass coloring of the Nasturtium flowers and the curious rounded leaves have inspired for many famous artists and writers.

Nasturtiums have long been known but during the Victorian era, into the early 20th century seemed most charmed by these plants. From Monet, William Morris, Moorcroft(pottery) to Tiffany’s famous glass, the plants where used everywhere as a charming and attractive subject. Nasturtiums of course are a famous subject for botanical prints. Who does not love a bouquet of the fragrant brightly colored Nasturtiums on a table or windowsill to cheer one up.

This bunny hides in the Nasturtiums in the Childrens Garden at Glendale Gardens.

This bunny hides in the Nasturtiums in the Childrens Garden at Glendale Gardens.

Tropaeolum majus is an easy plant to grow for the new or junior gardener. The seeds are big and easily handled and once planted germinate and grow quickly. They are not fussy and like sandy light, poorer soils, but will do equally well in richer soils although it will produce more leaves and less flowers. Full sun is most important to get the best showing of flowers unless you are in a very hot climate where a little shade in the afternoon will be appreciated. although they are somewhat drought tolerant regular watering will insure your plants continue to bloom for a long time. dead-heading the spent blossoms will help the plant to continue to bloom for months. Nasturtiums are considered to be hardy annuals and can tolerate a light frost, a hard one will kill them outright.

The Nasturtiums here are a cheery welcome to this garden.

The Nasturtiums here are a cheery welcome to this garden.

There are 2 main forms of Nasturtiums, the compact(or dwarf) and the trailing. The dwarf are at the most 45cm(18in) wide and tall with the trailing form being able to cover a 1m(3ft) space per plant. The beguiling flowers come in a vast tapestry of single-colors, bi-colors and blends ranging from the blackish-red ‘Mahogany’ to a pale buttery yellow and all ranges from red through scarlet, orange and yellows. Many named color varieties, singles, doubles and variegated(‘Alaska’)  and dark leaved(‘Empress of India’)  forms can be found in seed strains and are cheap to buy. Seed is easily saved for next year and often will reseed and grow in the same spot for many years.

Nasturtium 'Mahogany' has the darkest flowers that i have seen here in Victoria.

Nasturtium 'Mahogany' has the darkest flowers that i have seen here in Victoria.

Tropaeolum majus can be used in the garden in so many ways: edging, colorful filler for early bulbs and bloomers, childrens’ first garden, ground-cover, edible garden, fragrant garden, self seeding garden, old fashioned gardens, window boxes and containers, formal and informal settings and as artists subjects and fairy gardens.

Trailing and Twinning with Tropaeolums:

What is the reationship with the Cresses:  http://www.uni-graz.at/~katzer/engl/Lepi_sat.html

Nasturtiums as garden vegetables: http://www.veraveg.org/Veg%20History/Veg%20History%20Nasturtium.html

Look at all the art from these plants: http://www.google.ca/images?hl=en&q=Nasturtiums%20in%20art&um=1&ie=UTF-8&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&biw=1309&bih=741

Will you be following on this path?

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I do not know when I first met this plant as I feel like I have known it all my life. Where I grew up it is on the coldest edge of its temperature tolerance. I know I have seen it many places here in it’s many forms and colors. I think i like the very first form with its strong color and single flowers. Jackman Clematis (Clematis x jackmanii) is one of the true glories of the summer garden whether it is popping through a tree or doing the service of rambling over the ugly stump in the garden. We welcome all that you do for us!

Clematis x jackmanii 'Superba' gives an injects an incredible shot of color into gardens during the long days of summer.

Clematis x jackmanii 'Superba' gives an injects an incredible shot of color into gardens during the long days of summer.

Jackman Clematis are named for the famous family of nurserymen who developed them. The first member we meet is William(1763-1840) who started the nursery on 50 acres of land in St. Johns Woking, Surrey in England. He had sons George(jr.) and Henry who later took over the nursery in 1830 and this where the real story begins. George jr. (1801-1869) was the real nurseryman while his brother was ran the business. The business was renamed Jackman and Sons Nursery after George.  The nursery grew and was prosperous, later George’s  eldest son also named George (1837-1887)came to work in the business. The two Georges’ decided to start a breeding program with Clematis to create new forms in 1857. They crossed Clematis lanuginosa with viticella and within the first batch of seedlings was the famous Clematis x jackmanii with its dark purple color and broader petals.

This Clematis x jackmanii leans against a arbour post in the hot July sun.

This Clematis x jackmanii leans against an arbour post in the hot July sun.

As soon as the first Jackman Clematis started to be sold to the public  it was enormous success, everyone wanted one of these beautiful plants. It set a new standard for this species of plants.  Soon there were other members of the family to buy and in a broad color range , running from the original deep purple through red, pink, white, shades of lavender and mauve. Several double forms were also named. In 1872 the book ‘The Clematis as a Garden Flower’ was released by George Jackman in collaboration with  Thomas Moore. A second edition which was enlarged and updated was  issued in 1877.

Clematis 'Perle d Azur' is one of the more spectacular forms of Jackman Clematis.

Clematis 'Perle d Azur' is one of the more spectacular forms of Jackman Clematis.

The Jackman family carried on in the nursery business for several generations until the business was sold in 1967. The Jackman name will always be associated with the best that Clematis can be. Jackman Clematis all are strong growers and often bloom for several months.  One of their best attributes is when they bloom later from June into August and often they will have a repeat with the flowers having fewer petals in September.

Clematis 'Gipsy Queen' is easily recognizable with each petal having a maroon stripe though it.

Clematis 'Gipsy Queen' is easily recognizable with each petal having a maroon stripe though it.

Clematis are said to be tricky to grow, but having seen them in all kind of places from near-desert conditions to the rain forest here I know they are very adaptable. They like other members of the Ranunculus(Ranunculaceae) family do not like to have their roots disturbed. They can sulk and be slow to return to their glory.

Clematis x jackmanii can be a massive grower if it is planted in the right place.

Clematis x jackmanii can be a massive grower if it is planted in the right place.

Selection of  the right site for your Jackman Clematis is most important. Most members of the group grow up to 3m(10ft) high and a similar width while producing a multitude of vining stems if they are happy.  All Clematis like to have their roots in the shade and their stems in the sun for producing the most luxuriant leaves and flowers. In extreme southern sites or excessively stronger sun an eastern exposure is the best. Here in the Pacific Northwest they do nicely in full sun. They like light loamy well-drained soil best. drainage is important to avoid sudden Clematis death which is like a fungus.  Give them plenty of moisture during their growing season

This is the first blossom I have seen of Clematis x jackmanii 'Alba' in the St. Ann's Academy garden.

This is the first blossom I have seen of Clematis x jackmanii 'Alba' in the St. Ann's Academy garden.

Jackman Clematis can be used in a variety of ways. They are impressive growing over fences and on trellises. If you have something to hide let a colorful Clematis help out. Often they are seen in trees which bloom earlier in the year or paired with climbing Roses. We should be more adventurous with our planting and have a sense of fun, the Jackman’s took a chance and changed the garden world in ways that will last forever.

I love the creativity and sense of fun found in this garden in East Vancouver, the Clematis x jackmanii 'Superba' is a beguiling welcome here.

I love the creativity and sense of fun found in this garden in East Vancouver, the Clematis x jackmanii 'Superba' is a beguiling welcome here.

Although Clematis x jackmanii are rated as tolerating -2oc(-4)  or zones 4 through 9 I think they can be pushed to cooler places as I have seen healthy ones in zone 3 or -35c(-30 to-40f). They would need extra mulch and care not to go through the freeze/thaw/ freeze which damages so many plants.

On the Jackmanii trail:

A very good write up on Jackman Clematis: http://www.floridata.com/ref/c/clem_xja.cfm

about the Jackman Family: http://www.clematis.hull.ac.uk/new-clemnamedetail.cfm?dbkey=15

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We often came down at this time of the year to visit our grandparents near White Rock. We went to the beach for days, played on the old farm equipment and eating cherries which we picked from the fruit trees. My grandmother loved her garden and especially the flowers she received from friends, I remember her telling me about her wonderful roses, ‘Dr W. Van Fleet’ on the barn and I especially liked the hot pink one which grew up the pole near where we parked our car. It Is called ‘American Pillar’ Rose and is seen in many old gardens here.

The gaily colored Rosa 'American Pillar is common in older gardens here.

The gaily colored Rosa 'American Pillar' is common in older gardens here.

The ‘American Pillar’ Rose has been around since 1902(others say 1909) and is one of the most successful introductions made by an American Rose breeder. It is a cross between Rosa setigera x wichurana along with an unknown red pollen parent.  Both of the species roses had been used in the past are still today for their stellar qualities. Rosa setigera is called the ‘Climbing Prairie Rose and grows from southern Ontario through into Florida, it is an unusually hardy climbing type of Rose. Rosa wichurana is originally a Chinese rose is nearly evergreen and has very good disease resistance and crosses well with other species very well.

The 'American Pillar' Rose is a strong growing rambler which is often seen growing over fences like it is here at St. Ann's Academy.

The 'American Pillar' Rose is a strong growing rambler which is often seen growing over fences like it is here at St. Ann's Academy.

‘American Pillar’ Rose was developed by the famous Rose breeder Dr. W. Van Fleet of Glendale Maryland. Soon after introducing the new ‘Americna Pillar’ Rose it was clear that it was going to be hugely popular and was growing in many gardens along the American east coast. It soon became widely grown in Europe and especially in England. It now is seen in Rose collections throughout the world and is used in many historically based garden designs, there are several important Rose garden here where it is represented.

This Brightly flowering 'American Pillar' Rose is growing along Elk Lake Drive next to the park.

This Brightly flowering 'American Pillar' Rose is growing along Elk Lake Drive next to the park.

Like many plants that have been grown for a long time the ‘American Pillar’Rose is tough and adaptable. I know for sure my grandmother did not fuss about her plants and because she was on well water many of her plants did not get any during the dry summer months. Often this rose is seen here where there had been a homestead which is long gone, this could give someone the impression that these plants grow wild here.

The leaves of the 'American Pillar'Rose are glossy and disease resistant.

The leaves of the 'American Pillar'Rose are glossy and disease resistant.

The ‘American Pillar’ Rose is a vigorous  rambler type plant which can overtake other weaker plants, care must be taken when placing it. It has an overall arching and sprawling habit and will grow to nearly 6m(18ft) in length and 3m(10ft) wide. It makes an excellent specimen to climb a tree and have its bright cheery flowers hang down from the branches.

I found this 'American Pillar' Rose peeping out through a jumble of other plants near the dock at Fulford Harbor on Saltspring Island.

I found this 'American Pillar' Rose peeping out through a jumble of other plants near the dock at Fulford Harbor on Saltspring Island.

‘American Pillar’ Roses are tolerant of poor soils and drier sites which why they survive long after the gardens they were planted in are gone. They like well drained soil which hold some moisture for the drier periods. Remember to give it some bonemeal when you plant it and some mulch every year in the spring. They prefer full sun but are one of the better blooming Roses for shady locations. Wetter weather can promote disease on all Roses, here I have seen mildew for the first time this year on this plant, later growth has been free of leaf damage. They are rated as tolerating -25c(-10f) although i think they would be hardier, there are fine specimens found in parts of Ontario and Quebec.

The large clusters of bright pink flowers with large gold and white eyes make 'American Pillar' Roses very recognizable.

The large clusters of bright pink flowers with large gold and white eyes make 'American Pillar' Roses very recognizable.

Need to cover that ugly fence or cover that dying old tree, ‘American Pillar’ Rose to the rescue!  Give this plant lots of space to spread out and you will be rewarded for many years to come.  Little pruning is needed except to control it and remove weak canes, fortunately the job is easy as there are  few thorns.  Some people claim this plant has a slight fragrance and others do not notice any scent, I am with the later group and do not smell anything.

Rambling about American Pillar Roses:

A simple picture document of this roses growth: http://www.ph-rose-gardens.com/01012.htm

An article on suitable pergola roses for Ontario: http://www.landscapeontario.com/the-romantic-pergola-garden

The rose is found at the famous Annapolis Royal Historical Gardens in Nova Scotia: http://museum.gov.ns.ca/imagesns/html/31538.html

Next week another plant adventure unfolds here, as always…..

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I am always looking for great plants to write about and often stumble upon new finds in the most unexpected places. last year while looking for different color forms of Lilacs I came across a plant which was growing through a clump of them which would bloom soon, I decided to come back later and find out what form it was later. I knew it was a rose and it looked familiar, I had seen it somewhere before. In fact I see  it every time I go to St.Ann’s Academy because the rose in question turned out to be a very healthy ‘Felicite Perpetue’ Rose (Rosa ‘Felicite Perpetue’).

 Rosa 'Felicite Perpetue' is a delicate looking Rambling Rose.

Rosa 'Felicite Perpetue' is a delicate looking Rambling Rose.

Rosa ‘Felicite Perpetue’ is a delicate yet vigorous Rambler which has been known since the early 19th century. Antoine A. Jacques  was the head gardener to Louis Phillipe, Duc d’ Orleans  for many years and took care of his estates which included Chateau Neuilly. Duc d’ Orleans( later the king of France) loved plants and had a vast collection for A.A. Jacques to work with. At Chateau Neuilly Jacques made some crosses of roses and named at least 3 which have gone on to become famous on their own. Those roses where  ‘Adélaïde d’Orléans’ in 1826, Rosa ‘Félicité Perpétue’ in 1827 and the less famous ‘Princesse Louise’ was introduced in 1829. Both ‘Adélaïde d’Orléans’ and the ‘Félicité Perpétue’ Rose both are easily found a rose nurseries, while the other is harder to find here at least.

tRosa ‘Félicité Perpétue’ is climbing up the veranda in the Novitiate Garden at St. Ann's Academy in Victoria.

Rosa ‘Félicité Perpétue’ is climbing up the veranda in the Novitiate Garden at St. Ann's Academy in Victoria.

There is some controversy to whether the crosses of Rosa ‘Felicite Perpetue’ and her sisters were done on purpose or where accidentally. A.A. Jacques said at the time they were accidental. other people believe they were planned as one of the parent plants is believed to be Rosa sempervirens which native to southern Europe but not in the area where ‘Felicite Perpetue’ was found. Rosa sempervirens gave ‘Felicite Perpetue’ was it’s nearly thornless flexible stems and attractive clean foliage which is evergreen in most areas. ‘Felicite Perpetue’ is now the most widely grown semperviren hybrid grown in the world.

The foliage of the 'Felicite Perpetue' Rose is always attractive and clean looking.

The foliage of the 'Felicite Perpetue' Rose is always attractive and clean looking.

One of the reasons that Rosa ‘Felicite Perpetue’ has been so successful is its tolerance to a wider range of soil conditions than many other Roses. Often these old Roses are found growing on old homesteads or abandoned gardens, such is the case of the one I found growing through a clump of old Lilacs. The Lilacs and Rose were definitely not part of the planned landscape found at the Institute of Ocean Sciences on Pat Bay near Sidney B.C. You will not find it easily as it is not seen from the roadside, instead you have to look carefully in the thickets of Lilacs to find it hanging down from above.

Here is Rosa 'Felicite Perpetue' at the Institute of Ocean Sciences peeping through the Lilacs.

Here is Rosa 'Felicite Perpetue' at the Institute of Ocean Sciences peeping through the Lilacs.

Rosa ‘Felicite Perpetue’ grows best in fertile, well-drained soil in full sun. It tolerates drought better than many roses and will bloom in more shady places. The leaves do not suffer from the dreaded black spot or mildews here, I have never seen it on any plants. The only thing that is a problem is aphids which are very common here. The stems are flexible and have few spines and have an attractive wine color which is shown of by the flower buds which are pink. This is a vigorous plant which can grow to over 6m(20ft)in height and width in choice growing places.  Here it rarely attains more than 4.5m(15ft) and is often seen hanging down from within trees or shrubs. Little pruning is needed other than the occasional shaping, remember when you are pruning that this rose sets its blooms on the previous years growth of lateral stems and you should do any major trimming soon after it blooms so you do not lose the following years flowers.

A Rosa ‘Felicite Perpetue’  flower has as many as 40 petals.

A Rosa ‘Felicite Perpetue’ flower has as many as 40 petals.

As an old hybrid Rosa ‘Felicite Perpetue’ flowers once a year and produces masses of smaller 3cm(1.5in) diameter blossoms which are produced in clusters. The dense rose-tinted buds contain as many as 40 petals which open a lightly fragrant creamy white, heat and sun exposure does effect color and deepens it. The flower petals do not fall of the flowers therefore deadheading after the blooms have finished is advised. Little pruning is needed other than the occasional shaping, remember when you are pruning that this rose sets its blooms on the previous years growth of lateral stems and you should do any major trimming soon after it blooms so you do not lose the following years flowers.

A large patch of Rosa 'Felicite Perpetue' growing in the shade at St. Ann's Academy and blooms every year.

A large patch of Rosa 'Felicite Perpetue' growing in the shade at St. Ann's Academy and blooms every year.

Finding ‘Felicite Perpetue':

A little about Antoine A. Jacques, gardener and rose breeder: http://www.historicroses.org/index.php?id=40

Rosa sempervirens: http://www.rogersroses.com/gallery/DisplayBlock~bid~152~gid~15~source~gallerydefault.asp

Someone else stumble upon the rose and posted here: http://www.heritagerosefoundation.org/discus/messages/269/1924.html?1148962455

St. Ann’s Academy in Victoria B.C.: http://stannsacademy.com/HistoryResearch/Places.aspx

Where will we meet next… here I hope!

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Living in the tropical zone of Canada, I can grow all kinds of plants which can not survive anywhere else in the country. We still are not happy though and continue to push the boundaries and try things which will barely survive or outright die in a cold winter.  Two members of the exotic (at least to me) Jasmine family grow here and best of those is Winter Blooming Jasmine(Jasmine nudiflorum).

Jasminium nudiflorum is Winter Jasmine

Winter Blooming Jasimine is a unusual and attractive hardy shrub.

Jasmine or Jessamine are a group of 200 species made up of shrubs and climbing vines, they are found mainly in tropical areas with the exception of a few which live in more temperate areas of the world.  Jasmine (Jasminium) is from a form of later medieval Latin and is from the Persian name Yasmin or Yasamin. ‘Nudiflorum’ refers to the flowers blooming before there are any leaves on the plant.  Winter Flowering  Jasmine comes from China and has been cultivated since ancient times there. Here it was introduced in western cultivation in 1844 by Robert Fortune. It is interesting that the only form found in the wild now is Jasminium nudiflorum var. pulvinatum which has been collected by George Forrest in Yunnan.

Winter Hardy Jasmine

An attractive Jasminium nudiflorum growing in the winter garden at Government House.

Jasmine are from the Oleacae family named for the Olive tree(Olea europea). The Oleacae family has  29 genera which includes  the familiar Lilacs(Syringa), Osmanthus, Forsythia, Ash trees(Fraxinus) and Privet(Ligustrum). Most members of the family have hollow stems and this feature can be found in Winter Blooming Jasmine as well.

Jasminium nudiflorum

This Winter Blooming Jasmine is planted on the shady side of a house next to my sisters' place.

Winter Blooming Jasmine is not common here and it should be, it has bright flowers during the darkest months of the year. The flowers are frost tolerant and are not damaged or rot from cold snaps. They also stand up well to the huge amount of rain which we get at this time of year, this may be due to the fact that they are small simple flowers which do not weigh down from excess water.

Winter Blooming Jasmine

This time last year there was about 20cm(8in.) of snow and ice at the base of this Winter Blooming Jasmine.

Jasminium nudiflorum is usually seen  as a vine but it really is a very lax growing shrub. In the winter when the leaves are gone it still is one of the greenest shrubs around. As a shrub is a slender and delicate looking plant which is often propped up against a structure such as a wall or tree trunk. As seen in the above photo, Jasmine are excellent trellis plants.

Jasminium nudiflorum 'Aureum'

The same plant as above shows us that it is the rare Jasminium nudiflorum 'Aureum'

Winter Flowering jasmine are easy to grow and should be seen more in gardens today.  It is a very adaptable shrub which tolerate full sun to dappled shade and will still bloom well. It is not to fussy about it’s soil and can be planted in poor soils as long as they are drained well enough. This is a plant which has the added advantage of being somewhat drought tolerant. It is easy to transplant and takes a trimming very well as long as its done soon after flowering is over.

 Jasminium nudiflorum

This Jasminium nudiflorum is planted so it grows down a steep bank, a very good use for this plant.

I think that sometimes people mistake this shrub for the dreaded ‘Broom’ which is a scourge on the land around here. They both have twiggy green stems and yellow flowers. Fear not, Winter Blooming Jasmine is a well behaved plant which will not seed everywhere or spread to areas and over run native plants.  Jasminum nudiflorum can be used as winter color or winter feature, growing over retaining walls or slopes, a spreading or sprawling shrub, on a trellis or leaning up a tree or other less appealing structure.

Winter Blooming Jasmine

Cool weather often give hints of red on the stems of Winter Blooming Jasmine.

Winter Blooming Jasmine is rated at zones 6 through 9 and tolerated temperature of -15c( 5f). It can grow to 3m(10ft) tall and wide when allowed to sprawl on the ground.

Links to Love about Jasminum nudiflorum:

Floridata always offers good information about plants: http://www.floridata.com/ref/j/jasm_nud.cfm

A good detailed information page on this plant: http://www.perennials.com/seeplant.html?item=7.775.100

About the Olive family and it’s members: http://hcs.osu.edu/hcs300/olea.htm

Until we meet again later on….

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Living here in the Northwest I am always happy to find free sources of food. What I mean is I have learned about and have sampled many native plants which grow here. Some are the same ones I knew from growing up in the interior and others are strictly coastal natives. Other plants have been here so long and are so abundant that we assume they have always been here…..

West Coast or East Coast, We All Love Blackberries!

West Coast or East Coast, We All Love Blackberries!

The ‘Black Sheep’ of the Berry Family is on the Loose…. with Kim’s bountiful crop of Blackberry recipes.

http://thegardenpalette.wordpress.com/2009/08/19/the-%e2%80%98-black-sheep%e2%80%99-of-the-berry-family/

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My mother’s parents lived on a farm in Surrey for most of my life.  As a child we came to visit every summer and went to the beach, the big city and if we were lucky eat fresh cherries off the tree.  Later I had a job near were my grandmother lived and would visit her often. it was during this time that we discussed her garden and i would help her with it.  It seemed every plant in her garden had a story, who she had received it from, how she learned about it and took care of it. Of all the plants she had collected in nearly 50 years living there, the roses where her favorites. She took particular pleasure in the big rambling rose which grew over the barn and bloomed once a year. It, she proudly told was Dr. Van Fleet and had the most beautiful blooms of all. She was right, it was beautiful and what is even better is it’s ‘sport’ the New Dawn Rose which was discovered in 1930.

The Rambling 'New Dawn' Rose.

The Rambling 'New Dawn' Rose.

Every year at this time I see new Dawn rose in all it’s glory at the Memorial Rose Garden next to the Sidney Library. I have enjoyed visiting the garden through the year and the roses there are kept in perfect heath and beauty. It is a formally laid out  rose garden. The arbor which the New Dawn Rose grows up was constructed the Town of Sidney Parks Department as a memorial to the late Robert(Bob) Jackson who developed the Memorial Rose Garden. It is not surprising that the ‘New Dawn’ Rose was selected to be featured as it was selected as the worlds most popular rose in 1997.

New Dawn Rose Growing Happily on the Arborr in the Sidney Memorial Rose Garden

New Dawn Rose Growing Happily on the Arborr in the Sidney Memorial Rose Garden

Dr Walter Van Fleet (1857-1922) was the developer of the ‘New Dawn Rose indirectly. He developed the very famous Dr. Van Fleet and released it in 1910. His intention was to create more hardy roses which would grow well in the colder North American climate where he lived.  Over time he selected Rosa wichuriana(the ‘Memorial Rose’), a white rose as one species to work with. This rose contributed it’s lax stem habit and lovely semi-evergreen disease resistance. The cross is (R.wichuriana x Safrano) x Souv. Du Pres. Carnot, the later two not in common cultivation anymore. ‘New Dawn’ Rose was a sport which shared most of the ‘Van Fleet’  attributes but is said to be re-blooming and be slightly less fragrant.

'New Dawn' Roses Are Semi-double Flowering.

'New Dawn' Roses Are Semi-double Flowering.

A ‘sport’ is a change in the plant at a cellular level. Some are very stable and can be propagated easily and others are not strong enough or stable and disappear. Finding a branch or plant that has changed in this way has lead to the introduction of many new forms of plants particularly those with variegation or double flowers.  The ‘New Dawn’ Rose sport was more subtle and someone must have watched very carefully to have noticed the that it changed.

The Hotter the Weather the Paler the Pink Will be in 'New Dawn' Roses.

The Hotter the Weather the Paler the Pink Will be in 'New Dawn' Roses.

New Dawn Roses are vigorous and need to be placed carefully so they do not run over weaker growing plants. It grows 20-25ft(4-5m) and is perfect for growing over an ugly fence, up and old tree or in a more formal setting. It is a clean and healthy plant which tolerates less than perfect conditions. it takes poorer soil and more shade than many other roses. I be can planted on north facing  situations. It is rated at zones 5(-20c or -5f) through 9.  To promote re-blooming and healthy growth it is best to remove(deadhead) the spent blooms and give it a light pruning after it’s first flower flush. It makes a fine cut flowers with it’s long stems.

'New Dawn' Roses Hnaging Down From the Arbor In Sidney.

'New Dawn' Roses Hanging Down From the Arbor In Sidney.

To learn More About ‘New Dawn’ Roses :

All you need to know about ‘New Dawn’ Roses: http://www.backyardgardener.com/plantname/pda_5428.html

Where to find the Memorial Rose Garden in Sidney, B.C. http://virtualvacationguide.com/guide.php?setpanorama=476

Van Fleet’s Roses:  http://www.nytimes.com/1998/07/23/garden/garden-q-a.html

Plant ‘sports’ also known as chimeras: http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/tisscult/Chimeras/chimeralec/chimeras.html

Until We meet Again Later This Week…..

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